Tag Archives: diabetes diet

Obesity – who deserves the blame?

einstein

After Susan Jebb, the Government’s former diet tsar, said obesity is mainly caused by a person’s genes and the prevalence of junk food, other experts have hit out saying fat people should be told their size is their own fault. So just who SHOULD carry the blame for your obesity, asks a news article this weekend?

It comes down to the difference between ignorance and insanity.

It’s true that the food industry, Public Health, and the NHS in the UK have all mislead the public for years. Sadly knowingly for some time too. They ALL sold us the “low-fat myth” for decades. They ALL overlooked the fact that there was no real evidence against saturated fat. They ALL overlooked the weight of evidence against sugar for 40 years.

We became a fat nation! And I say obesity was encouraged because the organisations who should have protected us kept us in IGNORANCE. Ignorance about why we were really gaining weight. Ignorance about why  a whole host of chronic diseases have been burgeoning. Ignorance about the “unrelenting march” of diabetes reported last week.

But we know now! We know sugar is deadly. We know it has raised our levels of inflammatory disease to crisis point: diabetes, heart disease, vascular disease, some cancers and more. And we can no longer claim ignorance. We can no longer claim to being kept in the dark.

The food industry is showing very little sign of change. In the many months now since we lifted the lid on the nonsense that is “low-fat”, I’ve watched in near despair as more and more fat-free and low-fat products have been unleashed into the market-place – still claiming health-benefits. It sucks, it really does. But we are no longer ignorant to the truth. We can shake our heads in disbelief that they care so little. But we no longer have to fall for their dishonest hype!

I started speaking out against low fat as long ago as 2003 – and I have never knowingly put a low-fat-sugar-laden version of food into my body since. But I still do occasionally eat something with added sugar: a bite of chocolate, a slice of birthday cake, the occasional dessert maybe. And every time I do I know, and accept, that my behaviour is INSANE. Insane because there is enough information to enable me to make a better choice. Insane because I have enough knowledge to enable me to make a better choice. Sometimes I make insane choices, but I have to face the fact they are MINE!

I am at the point of awareness that any weight gain is certainly now my own fault, and I carry 100% responsibility.

Historically Susan Jebb is right – the past 40 years have largely been not our fault. But from here on in we are all responsible for our own food choices – as these experts suggest! And only when we accept our own responsibility, embrace our own dietary and behavioural change, take control over our own choices will things improve.

RebalanceDiabetes is ready and waiting to help anyone willing to help themselves. Give me a shout!

 

 

 

But aren’t they natural sugars?

Mince pies? Christmas cake? Christmas pudding? Tis the season to be jolly – and of dried fruits!

And fruit is healthy, right?

So if you find some of these lovely seasonal foods with no added sugar, it necessarily follows they are, if not actually good for you, OK at least doesn’t it?

Sadly it doesn’t necessarily follow.

There is ongoing debate about fructose – the sugar naturally occurring in fruit.  We know now that fructose is processed differently in the body compared with other sugars. Almost ALL the fructose we eat ends up being stored directly as body fat. Belly fat. The kind that settles in and around the internal organs. Visceral fat. Linked with type 2 diabetes, insulin resistance, heart disease, strokes etc.

If you want the scientific explanation – here it is.

The issue with these Christmas delicacies, is that, even without added sugars, they contain whopping amounts of fructose because it’s so concentrated in dried fruits compared to fresh fruits. One small portion of Christmas pudding might deliver 50 or more grams of sugar. Add to that the sugar in a mince pie or two, a piece of Christmas cake at tea time, nibbling on the occasional seasonal date, and you might be racking up a considerable amount of sugar – just from naturally occurring fructose found in dried fruits.

All things in moderation, so they say. When it comes to Christmas fayre the crux is knowing how little actually constitutes moderation.

I wish you the happiest festive season, but most of all good health!

Elaine x

 

 

 

Whatever is next – RebalanceDiabetes is right here for you!

shelovesyork2December 1st 2015 and – with International Diabetes Awareness Month 2015 closed – I’m reflecting on what we’ve achieved and, crucially, what’s next.

I started the month calling for everyone affected by diabetes to #standtogether. And I ended the month repeating that call because, as far as I’m concerned, it doesn’t matter whether you have Type 1, Type 2, gestational diabetes, take insulin, or not, are prediabetic, care for someone living with diabetes, or are just interested, there is an awareness mountain to be climbed.

Throughout November I’ve shared my awareness film The Silent Killer, shown on Times Square on World Diabetes Day; a fabulous offer to enable you to join The RebalanceDiabetes Programme (the first comprehensive diet and lifestyle programme for diabetes available online) at a massively discounted rate; brand new RebalanceDiabetes success stories to motivate and encourage; breaking news stories; and I shared a preview of the latest stats around diabetes. These latest stats are available for download today – get your copy of the Exec Summary of IDF’s latest Diabetes Atlas – click here.

The new diabetes years starts here. RebalanceDiabetes is ahead of the game, has always been ahead of the game, and I plan to stay there. You can be assured I’ll be doing everything I can to help YOU get the best from your health, feel great about yourself, enjoy life.

I genuinely don’t believe that diabetes has to win, I don’t believe the gloomy predictions have to come true, I do believe RebalanceDiabetes is the best solution. I’m with you every step of the way!

Here’s to a great year – starting NOW!

Elaine x

 

 

 

To tax or not to tax?

sugar writingToday marks the final day of International Diabetes Awareness Month 2015.

Today the sugar tax debate is hitting the media again in a big way.

Whether you are for or against a sugar tax it seems a fitting time to give more attention to this debate, and to turn the spotlight again on sugar: the dangers of sugar, the role of sugar on public health, the economics of sugar.

Is this the first time in living history that a Government has resisted such public calls for a tax? Resisted an opportunity to boost the chancellor’s coffers, with strong public support? The political stance is curious to say the least.

Here is a selection of the articles I’ve come across this morning:

MPs back sugar tax and ban on junkfood ads during X-factor

Jamie Oliver’s right! MPs say it’s time for a 20% tax on sugary drinks to tackle childhood obesity

Ban Junk Food Ads And Tax Sugary Drinks – MPs

UK MPs seek tighter measures on sugary drinks to tackle childhood obesity 

MPs back sugar tax endorsed by celebrity chef Jamie Oliver

Breakfast Briefing: Pressure grows on Gov for sugar tax

Tax sugary drinks and restrict TV adverts for sweets, MPs urge

MPs to call for ‘sugar tax’ and tighter controls on junk food ads

Introduce tax on sugary drinks, say MPs

MPs call for sugar tax to combat obesity

Radical Overhaul Needed To Beat Obesity – MPs

MPs demand 20% levy for fizzy drinks and blitz on junk food deals

Sugar tax: MPs join call to cut £5bn a year cost of obesity

Commons health committee puts weight behind UK sugar tax

Commons chiefs to demand ‘sugar tax‘ and tighter controls on junk food ads

Despite all those calls for the sugar tax, there is an “against” view point also reported this morning. It’s a minority of the British people who believe such a tax would be effective in combating obesity and disease – including diabetes:

British public unconvinced by soft drinks tax

I am throwing my hat onto the side that says there probably is a better way – regulate the food industry, restrict the amount of sugar permitted in processed foods, education, more transparent food labelling…

I am grateful this topic is working its way up political agendas. Let this debate rage!!

 

Don’t get depressed. Get motivated!

edison

Day 29 International Diabetes Awareness Month: as ever new stats are released each year about now.

The seventh and latest “Diabetes Atlas” will be released for download by the International Diabetes Federation on Tuesday 1st December.

Again this year they will make depressing reading – the figures are continuing to look worse.

I have a preview to share with you:

  • 415 million people are now diagnosed with diabetes
  • That’s 1 in 11 adults now living with diabetes
  • By 2040, it is predicted the number of cases will rise to 642 million
  • That will be 10% of the adult population
  • Deaths are now running at 5 million a year
  • One person dies from diabetes every six seconds.
  • 1 in 7 births is affected by gestational diabetes

It’s crucial we don’t bury our heads in the sand and pretend these figures don’t matter or will go away if we simply ignore them.

Let’s harness our feelings about them to generate a motivation to turn them around. What about if next year we can say there’s an improvement?

It’s only impossible if we collectively decide it’s impossible! We will not give up!

 

Innocent Type 1s? How divisive!

are-you-an-angel-or-a-devilI found an article yesterday. You might already have seen it by now. It’s entitled, “Call for healthy eating and exercise on World Diabetes Day neglects innocent Type 1 patients“.

I hate, actually hate, that title. “Innocent Type 1 patients” says what about people living with Type 2 diabetes? That they are not innocent it can only be assumed.

This awful article, published in the Inquisitr, and penned by Dawn Papple goes on to say,

Type 1 diabetics are innocent sufferers of an autoimmune condition. These patients haven’t necessarily eaten too much sugar or failed to exercise.

True on the one hand. The problem being that on the other Ms Papple alludes that people living with Type 2 diabetes are guilty sufferers? Guilty of having eaten too much sugar or failed to exercise?

Well I am writing today to inform Ms Papple, and anyone who has applauded her article, that not everyone with Type 2 diabetes has overindulged in sugar or sloth either. Whether through ignorance or intention she fails to show any understanding of Type 2 diabetes, or to represent Type 2 patients with the same consideration she demands for people living with Type 1 diabetes. Her article laments the lack of understanding about Type 1 diabetes, whilst showcasing her own acute lack of understanding of Type 2 diabetes!

She writes:

Many people have come to associate diabetes with obesity, but as this new campaign shows, people who appear physically fit can be fighting for their lives against Type 1 diabetes.

Well here’s the shocking truth – people who appear physically fit can be fighting for their lives against Type 2 diabetes!

Research shows there is a genetic aspect to Type 2 as well as Type 1. Like it or not, research shows there are some food links with Type 1 as well as Type 2. Research also shows that it’s such a common phenomenon for older people with Type 2 to be lean (estimates suggest 20%) that another recent article proposes a new label – Type 4 diabetes. One of my own clients is a lady, aged 61 years and weighing just 55kg, or 120lbs, or about 8 and a half stones – HbA1c 45 and heading north in consecutive tests! Not yet diabetic, but on her way. On her innocent way!

Furthermore, a new test is being developed to distinguish between Type 1 and Type 2 diabetes at the point of diagnosis – precisely because the boundaries between the two are not so clear cut!

All this highlights is the uselessness of labels. Type 1 and Type 2 and, potentially, Type 4 are all man-made constructs of language. They should not be used divisively, discriminatingly, or to the detriment of anyone with diabetes.

Mahatma Ghandi said, “Be the change you want to see in the world”. May I suggest that if you want understanding and compassion for yourself, it would be appropriate to first show those same considerations to others?

I am thoroughly sick and tired of “diabetism”. Sick of any notion of innocent Type 1 v. self-imposed Type 2. The issues of pathogenesis are far more complex than this – for all types of diabetes.

At the start of November, I called for all people affected by diabetes to #standtogether. As we approach the end of International Diabetes Awareness Month 2015, I am again asking for ALL PEOPLE AFFECTED BY DIABETES TO #STANDTOGETHER!

Reflections on Paris for #WDD

14th November 2015 – World Diabetes Day, as it is every year to mark the birthday of Frederick Banting who discovered insulin and in doing so has saved many many lives.

Today, however, all anyone is talking about is the awfulness of the terrorist atrocities in Paris yesterday.

I’m in New York for #WDD, and I’ve picked up the Paris story on every one of about 20 news channels available on the TV in my hotel room. The international shock, fear and outrage is palpable!

I’m reflecting on the parallels I’ll be drawing today when my film “The Silent Killer” is being aired on the big screen in Times Square – and feeling how much weight Paris brings to my message today. Every one of those lives lost in Paris yesterday is being mourned across the world. Quite rightly so! Well over 100 people killed by terrorist guns is too appalling to contemplate, but today we are still stunned that it has happened! Here in NYC, Americans are bracing themselves, and I suspect people all around the world are feeling equally vulnerable.

Diabetes kills someone every 6 seconds. Every 6 seconds a life is lost – 24/7! That’s not tens of lives. It’s not hundreds of lives. It’s millions of lives every year. What puzzles me is where’s the outrage?
1 in 1 outWhen I posted on Facebook recently  that in the time taken to watch my film 10 lives could have been lost some bright spark wrote “and 10 could have been born 1 in 1 out”.

Why are lives lost to diabetes considered to be so cheap and worthless? Why are governments not mounting a crusade against one of the biggest killers in the world today?

If you have diabetes, at least until we generate enough outrage against this killer to get it stopped, it’s largely down to you.

Today I am asking every person living with diabetes to value your own life. Your life is not a statistic. Your death might not be globally mourned but it would nonetheless be a tragedy. Possibly a perfectly avoidable tragedy.

I created The RebalanceDiabetes Programme because I care. No bullshit!

https://www.udemy.com/the-rebalancediabetes-programme/

Elaine x

 

 

Diabetes diet dilemma?

health choicesThe World Health Organisation are calling for action. The International Diabetes Federation are calling for action.

The number of adults being diagnosed in the UK has increased by 65% in just 10 years. The number of adults headed for diabetes in the USA is almost 3 times that of the number of people diagnosed at this time – a massive 86 million people!

Governments around the world will not tax sugar. David Cameron, we know, has opposed a sugar tax, saying he believes there’s a better way.  Do you know what? I think he could be right. I think there probably is a better way – BUT it would still risk him falling out with his chums at Tate and Lyle. So all in all I’m pretty certain he isn’t looking for another way! And it seems the International Diabetes Federation are also sceptical about world leaders’ determination to do anything, according to this article at least!

And then it seems that ordinary people living with diabetes are so confused by conflicting or unclear dietary messages that they don’t know what to do to help themselves.

I’ve spent years building The RebalanceDiabetes Programme. It’s helping people just like you take control and improve their health and wellbeing. You don’t have to be confused. Simply pick a way that has been already shown to work and follow it! Don’t be distracted by other people’s confusion – just get your head down and do it for you. You’ll be glad you did!

Click here right now and get started!

 

 

Relationships between diet and Type 1 diabetes.

If I don’t start this article by immediately saying that Type 1 Diabetes is not caused by diet I know a lot of people will be upset. So there – that’s out of the way.

Type 1 diabetes is an autoimmune disease, which means the body’s own immune system attacks specialist insulin-producing cells, called beta-cells. Insulin is crucial for life – it transports sugar out of the blood stream to cells where it is used as fuel. When there is insufficient insulin blood glucose levels rise to dangerous, life-threatening, levels.

It’s usually said that Type 1 diabetes is a genetic disease, but it’s important to understand that having the associated genes does not make it inevitable that you’ll develop Type 1 diabetes. As the Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation (JDRF) puts it:

“Certain genes put people at a greater risk for developing type 1 diabetes, but are not the only factors involved. While there are no proven environmental triggers, researchers are looking for possible culprits, such as viral infections and toxins within our environment and foods.”

And there it is, the acknowledgement that maybe food does play a part in switching on the gene that causes you to go on to develop Type 1 diabetes. There have been some discoveries made about potential ways in which food might switch on the genes, but that’s a for another blog…

Today my blog explains why, even if diet is not a cause of Type 1 diabetes, it’s certainly central to the management of the disease. It worries me when people with Type 1 diabetes are told to eat what they like, and simply alter their dose of injected insulin to compensate for the sugar and carbohydrate content of the food. OK, I agree, that will keep you alive today, but it certainly has implications for your long-term health and well-being. Why?

We already know that sugar and refined carbs are the scourge of the modern diet for everyone. The over-consumption of sugar and carbs is fuelling the global tide of obesity, insulin-resistance and Type 2 diabetes. People with Type 1 diabetes are not protected from these problems. Indeed, a new phenomenon has been dubbed “double diabetes”, because doctors are increasingly having to deal with people who have Type 1 diabetes, but have also gone on to develop insulin resistance and Type 2 diabetes.

The key to avoiding double diabetes is to avoid an excessive intake of the wrong foods – the foods that will lead to the inflammation associated with metabolic syndrome. That means tailoring your diet to meet your activity levels and keeping your blood sugars as naturally balanced as possible. I’ve read a lot around this subject and I’m convinced that the way to manage this is with an individually tailored diet designed to require much lower insulin dosages.

Is that even possible? Well Simon Gilbert certainly found it is. Hear it from the man himself:

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And is this approach really as beneficial as I suggest? Well, you don’t have to take my word for it. This is what Simon Crack, Type 1 diabetic solicitor living in York, wrote to say after he had followed the RebalanceDiabetes approach for a little while.

So if you have Type 1 diabetes, and are concerned that you could be enjoying a better sense of well-being; wish to be free from the worries or disruption or experiences of worsening health; want more control, then please take action for yourself today.

You’ll find everything you need to create your own individually tailored diet in The RebalanceDiabetes Programme. Click here!

Get the results you would love at a fraction of the cost!

treatTo celebrate World Diabetes Day this November 14th, I’m making a fabulous offer to my blog readers.

Only for November I am offering you my online video course for the knock-down price of $99 (£77) instead of the full $297 (£231). That’s a huge 67% saving!

I’m doing this because I feel so passionately about helping people with diabetes, especially those who feel the standard approach is not working for them. One of the best ways I can support World Diabetes Day is to enable as many people as possible start to turn their life with diabetes around.

(Actually, that’s not all I’m doing – I’m also travelling all the way from my cottage in England to the bright lights of New York city to see a film I have commissioned being shown on one of the giant screens in Times Square on World Diabetes Day! But that’s another story…).

Just look at what these Udemy students who have already taken the course are saying:

Nathaniel: “Within the last two weeks I have lost 10lbs without feeling like I am trying hard…this course is worth its weight in gold…Thank you for turning my life around.”

Anne-Lise: “This course will change your life, the way you feel, and the way you look, all for the better.”

Dan: “Real help for real people…The Rebalance Diabetes Programme is a truly excellent learning experience.”

William: “It works…I have never felt better.”

Matt: “Really clear instructions…someone you can trust.”

My course has a 100% track record of success – yes, really! All the people who put everything they learned on the course into practice now enjoy better blood sugar balance, have lost excess body fat and report more energy and vitality, and more!

And you can too, all for a $99 (about £77 at the current exchange rate) investment. You can study my 13-module video-based plan – 7 hours of content in total – whenever and wherever you want.

Click here: www.udemy.com/the-rebalancediabetes-programme Enter voucher code DAM2105. Enjoy!!