Tag Archives: blood sugar

Whatever is next – RebalanceDiabetes is right here for you!

shelovesyork2December 1st 2015 and – with International Diabetes Awareness Month 2015 closed – I’m reflecting on what we’ve achieved and, crucially, what’s next.

I started the month calling for everyone affected by diabetes to #standtogether. And I ended the month repeating that call because, as far as I’m concerned, it doesn’t matter whether you have Type 1, Type 2, gestational diabetes, take insulin, or not, are prediabetic, care for someone living with diabetes, or are just interested, there is an awareness mountain to be climbed.

Throughout November I’ve shared my awareness film The Silent Killer, shown on Times Square on World Diabetes Day; a fabulous offer to enable you to join The RebalanceDiabetes Programme (the first comprehensive diet and lifestyle programme for diabetes available online) at a massively discounted rate; brand new RebalanceDiabetes success stories to motivate and encourage; breaking news stories; and I shared a preview of the latest stats around diabetes. These latest stats are available for download today – get your copy of the Exec Summary of IDF’s latest Diabetes Atlas – click here.

The new diabetes years starts here. RebalanceDiabetes is ahead of the game, has always been ahead of the game, and I plan to stay there. You can be assured I’ll be doing everything I can to help YOU get the best from your health, feel great about yourself, enjoy life.

I genuinely don’t believe that diabetes has to win, I don’t believe the gloomy predictions have to come true, I do believe RebalanceDiabetes is the best solution. I’m with you every step of the way!

Here’s to a great year – starting NOW!

Elaine x

 

 

 

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To tax or not to tax?

sugar writingToday marks the final day of International Diabetes Awareness Month 2015.

Today the sugar tax debate is hitting the media again in a big way.

Whether you are for or against a sugar tax it seems a fitting time to give more attention to this debate, and to turn the spotlight again on sugar: the dangers of sugar, the role of sugar on public health, the economics of sugar.

Is this the first time in living history that a Government has resisted such public calls for a tax? Resisted an opportunity to boost the chancellor’s coffers, with strong public support? The political stance is curious to say the least.

Here is a selection of the articles I’ve come across this morning:

MPs back sugar tax and ban on junkfood ads during X-factor

Jamie Oliver’s right! MPs say it’s time for a 20% tax on sugary drinks to tackle childhood obesity

Ban Junk Food Ads And Tax Sugary Drinks – MPs

UK MPs seek tighter measures on sugary drinks to tackle childhood obesity 

MPs back sugar tax endorsed by celebrity chef Jamie Oliver

Breakfast Briefing: Pressure grows on Gov for sugar tax

Tax sugary drinks and restrict TV adverts for sweets, MPs urge

MPs to call for ‘sugar tax’ and tighter controls on junk food ads

Introduce tax on sugary drinks, say MPs

MPs call for sugar tax to combat obesity

Radical Overhaul Needed To Beat Obesity – MPs

MPs demand 20% levy for fizzy drinks and blitz on junk food deals

Sugar tax: MPs join call to cut £5bn a year cost of obesity

Commons health committee puts weight behind UK sugar tax

Commons chiefs to demand ‘sugar tax‘ and tighter controls on junk food ads

Despite all those calls for the sugar tax, there is an “against” view point also reported this morning. It’s a minority of the British people who believe such a tax would be effective in combating obesity and disease – including diabetes:

British public unconvinced by soft drinks tax

I am throwing my hat onto the side that says there probably is a better way – regulate the food industry, restrict the amount of sugar permitted in processed foods, education, more transparent food labelling…

I am grateful this topic is working its way up political agendas. Let this debate rage!!

 

Don’t get depressed. Get motivated!

edison

Day 29 International Diabetes Awareness Month: as ever new stats are released each year about now.

The seventh and latest “Diabetes Atlas” will be released for download by the International Diabetes Federation on Tuesday 1st December.

Again this year they will make depressing reading – the figures are continuing to look worse.

I have a preview to share with you:

  • 415 million people are now diagnosed with diabetes
  • That’s 1 in 11 adults now living with diabetes
  • By 2040, it is predicted the number of cases will rise to 642 million
  • That will be 10% of the adult population
  • Deaths are now running at 5 million a year
  • One person dies from diabetes every six seconds.
  • 1 in 7 births is affected by gestational diabetes

It’s crucial we don’t bury our heads in the sand and pretend these figures don’t matter or will go away if we simply ignore them.

Let’s harness our feelings about them to generate a motivation to turn them around. What about if next year we can say there’s an improvement?

It’s only impossible if we collectively decide it’s impossible! We will not give up!

 

Reflections on Paris for #WDD

14th November 2015 – World Diabetes Day, as it is every year to mark the birthday of Frederick Banting who discovered insulin and in doing so has saved many many lives.

Today, however, all anyone is talking about is the awfulness of the terrorist atrocities in Paris yesterday.

I’m in New York for #WDD, and I’ve picked up the Paris story on every one of about 20 news channels available on the TV in my hotel room. The international shock, fear and outrage is palpable!

I’m reflecting on the parallels I’ll be drawing today when my film “The Silent Killer” is being aired on the big screen in Times Square – and feeling how much weight Paris brings to my message today. Every one of those lives lost in Paris yesterday is being mourned across the world. Quite rightly so! Well over 100 people killed by terrorist guns is too appalling to contemplate, but today we are still stunned that it has happened! Here in NYC, Americans are bracing themselves, and I suspect people all around the world are feeling equally vulnerable.

Diabetes kills someone every 6 seconds. Every 6 seconds a life is lost – 24/7! That’s not tens of lives. It’s not hundreds of lives. It’s millions of lives every year. What puzzles me is where’s the outrage?
1 in 1 outWhen I posted on Facebook recently  that in the time taken to watch my film 10 lives could have been lost some bright spark wrote “and 10 could have been born 1 in 1 out”.

Why are lives lost to diabetes considered to be so cheap and worthless? Why are governments not mounting a crusade against one of the biggest killers in the world today?

If you have diabetes, at least until we generate enough outrage against this killer to get it stopped, it’s largely down to you.

Today I am asking every person living with diabetes to value your own life. Your life is not a statistic. Your death might not be globally mourned but it would nonetheless be a tragedy. Possibly a perfectly avoidable tragedy.

I created The RebalanceDiabetes Programme because I care. No bullshit!

https://www.udemy.com/the-rebalancediabetes-programme/

Elaine x

 

 

Diabetes diet dilemma?

health choicesThe World Health Organisation are calling for action. The International Diabetes Federation are calling for action.

The number of adults being diagnosed in the UK has increased by 65% in just 10 years. The number of adults headed for diabetes in the USA is almost 3 times that of the number of people diagnosed at this time – a massive 86 million people!

Governments around the world will not tax sugar. David Cameron, we know, has opposed a sugar tax, saying he believes there’s a better way.  Do you know what? I think he could be right. I think there probably is a better way – BUT it would still risk him falling out with his chums at Tate and Lyle. So all in all I’m pretty certain he isn’t looking for another way! And it seems the International Diabetes Federation are also sceptical about world leaders’ determination to do anything, according to this article at least!

And then it seems that ordinary people living with diabetes are so confused by conflicting or unclear dietary messages that they don’t know what to do to help themselves.

I’ve spent years building The RebalanceDiabetes Programme. It’s helping people just like you take control and improve their health and wellbeing. You don’t have to be confused. Simply pick a way that has been already shown to work and follow it! Don’t be distracted by other people’s confusion – just get your head down and do it for you. You’ll be glad you did!

Click here right now and get started!

 

 

Get the results you would love at a fraction of the cost!

treatTo celebrate World Diabetes Day this November 14th, I’m making a fabulous offer to my blog readers.

Only for November I am offering you my online video course for the knock-down price of $99 (£77) instead of the full $297 (£231). That’s a huge 67% saving!

I’m doing this because I feel so passionately about helping people with diabetes, especially those who feel the standard approach is not working for them. One of the best ways I can support World Diabetes Day is to enable as many people as possible start to turn their life with diabetes around.

(Actually, that’s not all I’m doing – I’m also travelling all the way from my cottage in England to the bright lights of New York city to see a film I have commissioned being shown on one of the giant screens in Times Square on World Diabetes Day! But that’s another story…).

Just look at what these Udemy students who have already taken the course are saying:

Nathaniel: “Within the last two weeks I have lost 10lbs without feeling like I am trying hard…this course is worth its weight in gold…Thank you for turning my life around.”

Anne-Lise: “This course will change your life, the way you feel, and the way you look, all for the better.”

Dan: “Real help for real people…The Rebalance Diabetes Programme is a truly excellent learning experience.”

William: “It works…I have never felt better.”

Matt: “Really clear instructions…someone you can trust.”

My course has a 100% track record of success – yes, really! All the people who put everything they learned on the course into practice now enjoy better blood sugar balance, have lost excess body fat and report more energy and vitality, and more!

And you can too, all for a $99 (about £77 at the current exchange rate) investment. You can study my 13-module video-based plan – 7 hours of content in total – whenever and wherever you want.

Click here: www.udemy.com/the-rebalancediabetes-programme Enter voucher code DAM2105. Enjoy!!

Healthy Halloween?

Halloween treat 1I love Halloween. Not least because it’s my wedding anniversary!

But I get that this can be a difficult day for people with diabetes. Take a look online and you’ll find conflicting advice – from don’t let your diabetic child indulge in candy at all, to the oft-heard rhetoric that eating candy didn’t cause diabetes so what’s the problem here? Confusion abounds.

My opinion is that it IS a problem. We are becoming increasingly aware that sugar is a big threat to health. Whether you already have diabetes or not, sugar is simply not a healthy diet choice. And if it isn’t a healthy choice for the general population, I totally fail to see that it can be an appropriate choice for a child whose little body cannot process sugar.

It isn’t OK to eat Halloween treat 4the candy, count the carbs and calculate the insulin dose, and here’s why: diet may not have caused diabetes, but it sure as anything is a central part of diabetes management. (That said, that explanation is for another blog another day.)

That’s where it can be really tricky – because no-one, least of all the kids themselves, want to be left out. Well I’ve been digging around to find attractive healthy options for Halloween treats. I found it really difficult: most of the  supposed healthy options are based on fruit or starchy vegetables.
Halloween treat 2

Better than sugar, and fine if you can limit the amounts your child chomps on but still too high GI really to let the kids overindulge.

Dotted around this post are some that tick low-GI boxes for treats. I didn’t devise these, I just found them. So kudos to all the creative folks, whoever you are, for devising these devilishly good snacks!

Halloween treat 5

This Halloween avoid the tricks and enjoy the real treats! #standtogether for #diabetes awareness

Halloween treat 3

Cereal killers?

Sipping my green tea in Waitrose’s cafe on Saturday, and browsing the weekend supplements, I came across an article about a cereal bar, Cereality, recently installed in Texas Fort Worth airport. The pictures of what might typically pass for breakfast or a snack were nothing if not disturbing.

Cartons of cereals, already sugary enough to be considered to be confectionery in their own right, mixed with chocolates, sweeties,
cookies, and dripping in syrups and sweet sauces. Food? Really? Have we so lost our marbles? Lost sight of what constitutes food, let alone healthy food? Or even an appropriate portion size of sugar?

A mere 20 minutes later, queuing at the checkout, my senses were further assaulted by the prominent display of breakfast cereals of the worst kind. Displayed in the most prominent position in the store.

Sugar laden, refined carbs in a box masquerading as food! IMG_20151003_172234

The kind that kids will nag their parents to buy. For the jolly cartoon images on the boxes. For the free junk toys inside. For the sugar on which the breakfast cereal industry is gleefully getting them hooked.And it struck me that breakfast cereal manufacturers and those peddling them are having a huge, and profitable, laugh in the face of ever rising rates of obesity and diabetes. And it’s simply not good enough!

Here’s why…

In 2009 Which? magazine investigated breakfast cereals, and, as reported in the press at the time, concluded that a mere 8% of tested brands would meet Food Standards Agency criteria for acceptable levels of sugar. In 2012 Which? revisited breakfast cereals and again concluded that few products would provide for a healthy breakfast.

In the intervening 3 years things have gone from bad to worse. Kelloggs and Nestle and chums have continued unabated to peddle their sugar-laden wares, and to add insult to injury have introduced ever more damaging options. Nestle even have the audacity to package some of the worst products, in my opinion, in “green top” boxes, devised to fool consumers that there is something healthy in the packet. There mostly isn’t!
Back to cereal cafes: as ever, what happens in the US eventually appears in the UK. Cereal cafes are no exception. Cereality in the States at least has a fluffy friendly name. But here in the UK it seems we’re prepared to openly embrace the darkest, most cynical side of this new trend.

Cereal Killer Cafe is aptly named indeed. Almost every conceivable brand of tooth-rotting, blood-sugar-disrupting breakfast carb is available. Alongside a piece of cake obviously!

Similar nutritionally-bankrupt concoctions – they call them cocktails – can be found at the unattractively-named Black Milk Cereal Dives popping up around the UK. Already-too-sugary cereal
products topped with Krispy Kreme doughnuts? Topped with Oreo cookies and chocolate sauce? Topped with Tootsie Rolls?

There simply has to be enough information out there about the dangers of sugar and refined carbs now for the owners of these questionable establishments to be fully aware of the health implications of their sugar bowls. Doesn’t there?

I pray the “food” industry never sinks lower than this. It’s hard to imagine that it could!

In the meantime I’m going to cry real tears and pray for a food industry in which sanity and ethics make a come-back! And I’m going to continue to eat, and recommend, eggs for breakfast!

The light at the end of this tunnel is the news that eggs are making a comeback – enjoying some well-deserved redemption. Once more for old times sake – “Go to Work on an Egg!”

Why would a 3 year old develop Type 2 diabetes?

chihood obesityA few days ago the world was aghast at the story of a 3 year old Texan toddler developing Type 2 diabetes. The newspapers, TV, radio and social media channels all carried the story.

This quote, in an article in The Independent, left me bemused:

Experts who reviewed the girl’s diet found “poor family nutritional habits with uncontrolled counting of calories and fat”.

Nowhere in this article was there any criticism of dietary sugar being a causal factor – just “calories” and “fat”. Surely there is enough evidence available now for us all to realise that the biggest dietary culprit for obesity amongst young children is sugar or refined carbs that the body can quickly turn into sugar. Yet this article lets the pure white and deadly stuff totally off the hook.

This story, sadly, isn’t isolated. In January this year we saw similar cases of Scottish children as young as 4 years of age also being diagnosed with Type 2 diabetes. The article carried in The Scotsman newspaper at the time also failed to discuss the role of sugar in relation to these children.

The media has a responsibility to keep up the pressure on sugar. Powerful lobbyists will be doing their best to downplay the role of sugar in the burgeoning obesity and diabetes crises, but for the sake of such young children we have to make sure the finger is well and truly pointed in the right direction. At sugar.

There is enough evidence now to back up the notion that added sugars should be a real focus for change: not just obvious sugars in sweets, cakes, biscuits etc, but those needless and mischievously added to savoury foods, sauces, processed foods. Then of course there is the issue that even fresh fruit and vegetables have been bred to contain more sugars, to make tastes more palatable to children it seems.

It’s really sad to see children developing serious debilitating conditions at such young ages, and it’s too simplistic just to blame parents. Now I’m not letting them off the hook here – it’s obvious that 5 and half stones is far too heavy for a 3 year old girl and yes parents of overweight children could take advice before things get to such extreme  levels. But advice from whom? The messages about healthy eating are confusing. I see plenty of evidence, both clinically and anecdotally in everyday life, of people becoming overweight and obese DESPITE trying to eat healthily. Next time you’re in a supermarket notice how many overweight people are pushing shopping trolleys filled with low-fat manufactured food products. The very products the food industry wants you to believe, and go on believing, will help you maintain good health and an appropriate weight. They won’t. Low-fat products mean higher-sugar products of course.

So it’s really unhelpful that we have the media STILL talking about fat instead of sugar in relation to obesity. We just need to stay focused on one simple message please: SUGAR IS MAKING OUR KIDS FAT AND SICK.

Sugar-free FARCE?

Honeycomb sliceI found myself nodding my head in agreement when I read the Daily Mail headline dismissing The Great British Bake Off “free-from” episode as farce.

Sugar isn’t always white and granular, or even brown and granular. And it isn’t always called ‘sugar’!

I doubt the contestants of the show were trying to deceive when they added honey, agave, syrups into their cakes. They just don’t understand the ingredients they use!

The show simply highlights the confusion around sugar. For so long we’ve been at the receiving end of messages about “healthy alternatives” to sugar. Those messages are largely wrong. Because the “alternatives” are themselves so often just other forms of sugar!

Honey, agave and fruit syrups contain fructose – the very sugar that is now linked with dangerous visceral fat and the body shape that often goes hand in hand with insulin resistance, Type 2 diabetes, inflammation, heart disease, stroke, some cancers and more. Fructose derviatives – hardly healthy and hardly an alternative.

So here are some of the common names you might find on food labels or in recipes that mean SUGAR:

Fructose, High fructose corn syrup, HFCS, Glucose, Invert sugar, Corn sweetener, Corn syrup, Fruit juice concentrate, Maltodextrin, Sucrose (table sugar), Honey, Lactose, Maltose, Raw sugar, Brown sugar, Molasses, Cane sugar, Raw cane sugar, Cane syrup, Brown rice syrup, Golden Syrup, Treacle, Caramel.

Anything that ends in ‘ose’ or called a ‘syrup’ should set your alarm bells ringing!

Why not learn more? Join my online programme – simply click here: https://www.udemy.com/the-rebalancediabetes-programme