Category Archives: body fat

Alcohol and your waistline.

accomplishMy mission this morning isn’t to debate the rights and wrongs of alcohol consumption. I’m not about to launch into a philosophical or psychological discussion about alcohol.

For some people alcohol is non-negotiable and it’s not my job today to try to negotiate that particular personal choice. If alcohol is non-negotiable for you then please save yourself a little time and trouble, stop reading now, and enjoy getting on with the rest of your day.

On 29th July 2013 an article appeared in my local newspaper about the remarkable effects of Rebalance. That morning the phone started to ring. And ring. And ring.

So many wanted to experience the benefits of Rebalance for themselves, and over the next couple of weeks my diary was full of appointments with folks wanting to know more. Most went on to become clients, and indeed they achieved success. I love those people, I love the results they achieved, but it’s not their success I’m writing about today.

In July 2013 I had to break the news to just a few people that I couldn’t help them – due to their relationship with alcohol. People like the chap who told me that he enjoyed 3 pints of beer 3 times a week, and wouldn’t be changing that. People like the lady who has 2 glasses of wine and a G&T every night to help her unwind, and doesn’t think she wants to change that. People like the lady who tells me all her friends drink, and that “it’s not my fault I have a social life“.

I’m not talking about alcoholism. This blog post is for people who stick within the limits of the recommended weekly units of alcohol, but for whom it is nonetheless a regular fact of life. It’s about helping you to understand why alcohol will likely hinder your weight loss and attempts to reach your wellness goals.

  1. Regular alcohol causes the levels of a stress hormone, cortisol, to become abnormally elevated. (As ever, at Rebalance we back up what we say, and if you’d like to read the research for yourself click here to make a start) Cortisol is especially significant for weight and health because chronically high levels are associated with a wide range of health problems, with metabolic changes leading to weight gain, with difficulty in losing weight: blood sugar imbalance, diabetes, obesity, immune system suppression, gastrointestinal problems, cardiovascular disease, fertility problems, insomnia, chronic fatigue syndrome, thyroid disorders, dementia, depression, and other conditions. (Another useful link: click here)
  2. Even moderate alcohol leads to visceral fat (link available here). We all know that of course – one of the earliest names for visceral fat was ‘beer belly’ after all! It’s this kind of body fat that is linked with many serious conditions, including: impaired glucose and lipid metabolism, insulin resistance, Type 2 diabetes; colon breast and prostate cancers; heart and cardiovascular disease; infections and non-infectious complications, including death. (Another useful link: click here)
  3. Alcohol is high in ’empty calories’. Drinkaware tells us the calories in alcohol are “extra fattening“, and almost the same as pure fat itself. Worse, is that those calories, being empty, provide no nutritional value, meaning that alcohol contributes nothing that our bodies can put to good use.
  4. Drinkaware further advises: “Drinking alcohol also reduces the amount of fat your body burns for energy. While we can store nutrients, protein, carbohydrates, and fat in our bodies, we can’t store alcohol. So our systems want to get rid of it, and doing so takes priority. All of the other processes that should be taking place (including absorbing nutrients and burning fat) are interrupted.”

So that’s 4 facts to help you understand how alcohol will interfere with your health and weightloss plans. The choice about what you do with that knowledge is all yours!

 

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Losing weight on 3300 calories per. day – yes really!

Let me tell you a little about my new client’s weight loss. After just 2 weeks on a Rebalance programme, he’s lost 5lbs, has literally had to tighten his belt, and feels great. Here’s the best bit…he’s eating 3300 calories per. day!

It’s not – and never has been – about calories. It’s about what those calories are made of – and always has been.

Fad diets come and go. I read this morning that the 5:2 Fasting Diet is trying to re-enthuse dieters by offering 200 calories per. day more. All those poor folks who have restricted themselves to just 600 calories for 2 days per. week, are now being told they could have achieved the same benefits on 800 calories, according to this report. Dr. Mosley, the chap advocating this joyless approach for some 5 years now, admits it makes people feel cranky and irritable, and that, actually, he’s been wrong about just how restrictive a diet needs to be.

The problem with fasting, and long term calorie restriction is that it puts your body into a “starvation mode” that makes it hang on to fat. Have you tried to diet and found by week 3 or 4 it gets harder and harder to shift just a little weight? The fallacy of fasting is made clear in a new study at the University of Sydney in Australia. The research team confirms:

“Having a few ‘days off’ from a diet can help stop your body from going into starvation mode, where the body slows down its natural burning of kilojoules, desperate to survive what it believes to be a famine.”

So if 600, or even 800, calories are too restrictive to enable someone to lose weight without finding themselves entering into starvation mode, how many calories are right? There is no single answer to that. MemeThe number of calories right for an individual is the number of calories right for that person! There is no-one-size-fits-all where nutrition is concerned. This is where Rebalance excels. We help you identify your own unique needs, and develop your own unique eating plan to meet those needs. Every time someone does this properly it works – that’s 100%. My client’s body requires 3300 calories per. day: this avoids starvation mode; delivers all his nutritional needs; encourages his body to release 2 lbs of fat per. week consistently. How many calories are right for YOU?

Click here, and start working it out. Our programmes work, are easy to follow, and are free to you.

Obesity – who deserves the blame?

einstein

After Susan Jebb, the Government’s former diet tsar, said obesity is mainly caused by a person’s genes and the prevalence of junk food, other experts have hit out saying fat people should be told their size is their own fault. So just who SHOULD carry the blame for your obesity, asks a news article this weekend?

It comes down to the difference between ignorance and insanity.

It’s true that the food industry, Public Health, and the NHS in the UK have all mislead the public for years. Sadly knowingly for some time too. They ALL sold us the “low-fat myth” for decades. They ALL overlooked the fact that there was no real evidence against saturated fat. They ALL overlooked the weight of evidence against sugar for 40 years.

We became a fat nation! And I say obesity was encouraged because the organisations who should have protected us kept us in IGNORANCE. Ignorance about why we were really gaining weight. Ignorance about why  a whole host of chronic diseases have been burgeoning. Ignorance about the “unrelenting march” of diabetes reported last week.

But we know now! We know sugar is deadly. We know it has raised our levels of inflammatory disease to crisis point: diabetes, heart disease, vascular disease, some cancers and more. And we can no longer claim ignorance. We can no longer claim to being kept in the dark.

The food industry is showing very little sign of change. In the many months now since we lifted the lid on the nonsense that is “low-fat”, I’ve watched in near despair as more and more fat-free and low-fat products have been unleashed into the market-place – still claiming health-benefits. It sucks, it really does. But we are no longer ignorant to the truth. We can shake our heads in disbelief that they care so little. But we no longer have to fall for their dishonest hype!

I started speaking out against low fat as long ago as 2003 – and I have never knowingly put a low-fat-sugar-laden version of food into my body since. But I still do occasionally eat something with added sugar: a bite of chocolate, a slice of birthday cake, the occasional dessert maybe. And every time I do I know, and accept, that my behaviour is INSANE. Insane because there is enough information to enable me to make a better choice. Insane because I have enough knowledge to enable me to make a better choice. Sometimes I make insane choices, but I have to face the fact they are MINE!

I am at the point of awareness that any weight gain is certainly now my own fault, and I carry 100% responsibility.

Historically Susan Jebb is right – the past 40 years have largely been not our fault. But from here on in we are all responsible for our own food choices – as these experts suggest! And only when we accept our own responsibility, embrace our own dietary and behavioural change, take control over our own choices will things improve.

RebalanceDiabetes is ready and waiting to help anyone willing to help themselves. Give me a shout!

 

 

 

Why you really need to think twice about bariatric surgery

imagesAre you still seeing reports that tell you gastric bands and bypasses are THE answer to obesity and Type 2 diabetes? OK so let’s talk about what the usual reports don’t tell you…

Already longer term problems are becoming known – and it’s a mystery why these things are ignored when the supposed benefits are heralded in the press and media.

Gastric surgery is far from being the life-long solution it is promised to be. Here are my top three reasons to think twice before diving onto the operating table:

The weight loss doesn’t last.

For at least a decade it’s been known that weight loss may be temporary. Bariatric Surgery Source – a comprehensive weight loss surgery resource – says:

“Weight gain after gastric bypass surgery is not guaranteed, but there’s a good chance that it will occur to some extent.” 

That “extent” was quantified in a press article a full 3 years ago – “a third of gastric surgery patients put ALL the weight back on” it was reported.

It is linked with greater risk of suicide.

The let-down of this reality has serious emotional impact. It has recently emerged that people who have had gastric surgery are more likely to go on to commit suicide – significantly after the initial weight loss period wains. Thankfully, this vital information WAS widely reported:

http://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/852616

http://www.webmd.com/diet/obesity/20151007/suicide-risk-may-rise-for-some-after-weight-loss-surgery?

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23297762

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/health/article-3263730/The-dark-weight-loss-surgery-People-operation-4-times-likely-commit-suicide-twice-likely-self-harm.html

You WILL have to manage life-long nutritional deficiencies.

What I have never seen reported is that ALL bariatric surgeries lead to nutritional deficiencies. Some procedures have worse effects than others, but it is the case that patients require nutritional supplements for life.

If you’re thinking that’s a small price to pay, please think again. I’ve shared often before in my various posts that supplementation isn’t the best way to nourish your body. For a start, nutrients are more bioavailable from food compared to pills and potions – that means your body will take up nutrients from food so much more readily than from a supplement. Then there’s the fact that high potency supplements have been shown in clinical trials to be harmful – sometimes the harm clearly outweighs benefit. The full extent of this risk was highlighted last week in a shocking report revealing that thousands of medical emergencies in the US are directly caused by nutritional supplements.

How can it be then that on the one-hand the medical profession bemoan the dangers of nutritional supplements, calling for tighter controls, but on the other hand happily hail a type of surgery that means life-long supplementation is inevitable? I don’t get it. And I’m sure Hippocrates wouldn’t have got it either.

The RebalanceDiabetes approach stands head and shoulders above the others – food first! Food before surgery. Food before supplementation. It doesn’t rely meal replacement shakes, bars and pills. And it never will!

To find out more visit www.rebalancediabetes.com

Why would a 3 year old develop Type 2 diabetes?

chihood obesityA few days ago the world was aghast at the story of a 3 year old Texan toddler developing Type 2 diabetes. The newspapers, TV, radio and social media channels all carried the story.

This quote, in an article in The Independent, left me bemused:

Experts who reviewed the girl’s diet found “poor family nutritional habits with uncontrolled counting of calories and fat”.

Nowhere in this article was there any criticism of dietary sugar being a causal factor – just “calories” and “fat”. Surely there is enough evidence available now for us all to realise that the biggest dietary culprit for obesity amongst young children is sugar or refined carbs that the body can quickly turn into sugar. Yet this article lets the pure white and deadly stuff totally off the hook.

This story, sadly, isn’t isolated. In January this year we saw similar cases of Scottish children as young as 4 years of age also being diagnosed with Type 2 diabetes. The article carried in The Scotsman newspaper at the time also failed to discuss the role of sugar in relation to these children.

The media has a responsibility to keep up the pressure on sugar. Powerful lobbyists will be doing their best to downplay the role of sugar in the burgeoning obesity and diabetes crises, but for the sake of such young children we have to make sure the finger is well and truly pointed in the right direction. At sugar.

There is enough evidence now to back up the notion that added sugars should be a real focus for change: not just obvious sugars in sweets, cakes, biscuits etc, but those needless and mischievously added to savoury foods, sauces, processed foods. Then of course there is the issue that even fresh fruit and vegetables have been bred to contain more sugars, to make tastes more palatable to children it seems.

It’s really sad to see children developing serious debilitating conditions at such young ages, and it’s too simplistic just to blame parents. Now I’m not letting them off the hook here – it’s obvious that 5 and half stones is far too heavy for a 3 year old girl and yes parents of overweight children could take advice before things get to such extreme  levels. But advice from whom? The messages about healthy eating are confusing. I see plenty of evidence, both clinically and anecdotally in everyday life, of people becoming overweight and obese DESPITE trying to eat healthily. Next time you’re in a supermarket notice how many overweight people are pushing shopping trolleys filled with low-fat manufactured food products. The very products the food industry wants you to believe, and go on believing, will help you maintain good health and an appropriate weight. They won’t. Low-fat products mean higher-sugar products of course.

So it’s really unhelpful that we have the media STILL talking about fat instead of sugar in relation to obesity. We just need to stay focused on one simple message please: SUGAR IS MAKING OUR KIDS FAT AND SICK.

Sugar-free FARCE?

Honeycomb sliceI found myself nodding my head in agreement when I read the Daily Mail headline dismissing The Great British Bake Off “free-from” episode as farce.

Sugar isn’t always white and granular, or even brown and granular. And it isn’t always called ‘sugar’!

I doubt the contestants of the show were trying to deceive when they added honey, agave, syrups into their cakes. They just don’t understand the ingredients they use!

The show simply highlights the confusion around sugar. For so long we’ve been at the receiving end of messages about “healthy alternatives” to sugar. Those messages are largely wrong. Because the “alternatives” are themselves so often just other forms of sugar!

Honey, agave and fruit syrups contain fructose – the very sugar that is now linked with dangerous visceral fat and the body shape that often goes hand in hand with insulin resistance, Type 2 diabetes, inflammation, heart disease, stroke, some cancers and more. Fructose derviatives – hardly healthy and hardly an alternative.

So here are some of the common names you might find on food labels or in recipes that mean SUGAR:

Fructose, High fructose corn syrup, HFCS, Glucose, Invert sugar, Corn sweetener, Corn syrup, Fruit juice concentrate, Maltodextrin, Sucrose (table sugar), Honey, Lactose, Maltose, Raw sugar, Brown sugar, Molasses, Cane sugar, Raw cane sugar, Cane syrup, Brown rice syrup, Golden Syrup, Treacle, Caramel.

Anything that ends in ‘ose’ or called a ‘syrup’ should set your alarm bells ringing!

Why not learn more? Join my online programme – simply click here: https://www.udemy.com/the-rebalancediabetes-programme

Diabetes soars by 60% in a decade? Here’s the answer!

60%The media this morning is full of the news that diabetes rates have soared by about 60% in the past decade. As a consequence it’s proposed NHS services will creak even more.

So it was with great disappointment that I came across an article from just 3 days ago. Just 3 days ago the NHS itself published an article about weight loss diets. It is a far from helpful article, giving no clear guidance to anyone wanting to lose weight, and continuing to promote low-fat diets. Any suggestion that low-fat might be the way to go for anyone
is absurd, but suggesting this might be a better option compared with low-carbs could just be catastrophic for people living with diabetes – either Type 1 or Type 2!

So here it is as simply as I can write it: THERE IS NO ONE-SIZE FITS ALL when it comes to diet and lifestyle.

As far as low-fat is concerned it’s way overdue that we should lay this myth to rest. Low-fat = more sugar. In 2011 the Harvard School for Public Health declared “It’s time to end the low-fat myth“, yet 4 years on our NHS still thinks there’s any room for debate? Have they not yet realised that 40 years of low-fat diets have largely contributed to our current situation? Ever increasing rates of obesity. Ever increasing rates of Type 2 diabetes. NHS resources stretched with no hope in sight.

As far as low-carb is concerned? It’s a meaningless generic term in my book. An appropriate level of carbs for me – sitting here writing for you – would be utterly inappropriate, and likely far too low, for anyone with a physical job. What would be appropriate for a person with a high level of daily physical activity would be way too many for me. I can feel my middle swelling just at the thought of it!

It’s time to get with the plot. Educate people to understand what is appropriate for their own unique circumstances and individual needs. Support them to get great results. Watch the health of the nation improve!

RebalanceDiabetes protects YOUR body composition – and why that’s crucial!

Fat measurementYour body composition is essentially a map of what you are made of on the inside, and it’s inseparably linked with your health and well-being.

Links between body composition and disease have been recognised for centuries – Hippocates, the father of modern medicine noticed as long ago as 460 – 370 BC that people carrying body fat were more likely than lean people to die suddenly.

2000 years on that might not be as true today with our modern medicines, but nonetheless body composition is still considered to be a really important indicator of health.

An article written in 1968 mentions the first steps being taken to be able to measure body composition – until then the only way to know someone’s body composition was by dissecting their bodies after death. Hmm lovely!! The same article talks about the first stages of understanding that different kinds of food have different effects on body composition.

Today, the study of body composition has advanced to the point where we recognise that weight loss is not the same as fat loss, and can be extremely detrimental to health. That’s because when we lose weight we usually lose healthy lean tissue – and sometimes lots of it! A Danish research study showed that, on average, when a man loses weight about 41% of that is healthy lean tissue instead of fat. For women the amount of lean tissue lost is about 35%. More-over, when weight is regained, the vast majority of it is fat – the healthy lean tissue is not always replaced. This means that yo-yo dieting has been linked with devastating changes to body composition – swapping healthy lean tissue for body fat over time. The Danish study showed that when people gain weight again, up to 85% is more fat!

The need to protect lean tissue when trying to lose weight is clear, and so clear it’s one of the underpinning aims of ‘the 6 diet’ and the RebalanceDiabetes programme. We’ve ensured, time after time, our clients achieve good fat loss, and I’m delighted to share that we’ve been successful yet again!

Violet is in her 13th week of the programme, and we’ve compared her before and after body composition tests. The results show that every single lb she has lost is body fat!. In fact it’s better than that – she’s actually increased her healthy lean tissues by a tiny amount! See for yourself – the before and after print-outs below:

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Violet’s first test (1 week after she started the eating plan) shows she had 105.1 lbs of lean tissue and 59.9lbs of body fat.Now, 12 weeks in, she has 105.4lbs of lean tissue and 45.6lbs of body fat.

According to the Danish study, she might have expected to lose over 5lbs of healthy lean tissue – but she has retained every single ounce, and more!

RebalanceDiabetes has 100% protected her healthy lean tissue.

Even though I say so myself – that’s incredible, amazing, fantastic!!

If you want to lose some weight in the healthiest way, drop me a line today: elaine@rebalancediabetes.com. If Violet can, what’s stopping you?