Relationships between diet and Type 1 diabetes.

If I don’t start this article by immediately saying that Type 1 Diabetes is not caused by diet I know a lot of people will be upset. So there – that’s out of the way.

Type 1 diabetes is an autoimmune disease, which means the body’s own immune system attacks specialist insulin-producing cells, called beta-cells. Insulin is crucial for life – it transports sugar out of the blood stream to cells where it is used as fuel. When there is insufficient insulin blood glucose levels rise to dangerous, life-threatening, levels.

It’s usually said that Type 1 diabetes is a genetic disease, but it’s important to understand that having the associated genes does not make it inevitable that you’ll develop Type 1 diabetes. As the Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation (JDRF) puts it:

“Certain genes put people at a greater risk for developing type 1 diabetes, but are not the only factors involved. While there are no proven environmental triggers, researchers are looking for possible culprits, such as viral infections and toxins within our environment and foods.”

And there it is, the acknowledgement that maybe food does play a part in switching on the gene that causes you to go on to develop Type 1 diabetes. There have been some discoveries made about potential ways in which food might switch on the genes, but that’s a for another blog…

Today my blog explains why, even if diet is not a cause of Type 1 diabetes, it’s certainly central to the management of the disease. It worries me when people with Type 1 diabetes are told to eat what they like, and simply alter their dose of injected insulin to compensate for the sugar and carbohydrate content of the food. OK, I agree, that will keep you alive today, but it certainly has implications for your long-term health and well-being. Why?

We already know that sugar and refined carbs are the scourge of the modern diet for everyone. The over-consumption of sugar and carbs is fuelling the global tide of obesity, insulin-resistance and Type 2 diabetes. People with Type 1 diabetes are not protected from these problems. Indeed, a new phenomenon has been dubbed “double diabetes”, because doctors are increasingly having to deal with people who have Type 1 diabetes, but have also gone on to develop insulin resistance and Type 2 diabetes.

The key to avoiding double diabetes is to avoid an excessive intake of the wrong foods – the foods that will lead to the inflammation associated with metabolic syndrome. That means tailoring your diet to meet your activity levels and keeping your blood sugars as naturally balanced as possible. I’ve read a lot around this subject and I’m convinced that the way to manage this is with an individually tailored diet designed to require much lower insulin dosages.

Is that even possible? Well Simon Gilbert certainly found it is. Hear it from the man himself:

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And is this approach really as beneficial as I suggest? Well, you don’t have to take my word for it. This is what Simon Crack, Type 1 diabetic solicitor living in York, wrote to say after he had followed the RebalanceDiabetes approach for a little while.

So if you have Type 1 diabetes, and are concerned that you could be enjoying a better sense of well-being; wish to be free from the worries or disruption or experiences of worsening health; want more control, then please take action for yourself today.

You’ll find everything you need to create your own individually tailored diet in The RebalanceDiabetes Programme. Click here!

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